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This week's featured articles

5/1/2022

Contrived Breathing Circuit Connection for Emergency Percutaneous Transtracheal Ventilation by Needle Cricothyrotomy in the Field

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Naftalovich R, Iskander AJ. 22(1). 102 - 103. (Journal Article)

Abstract

Surgical airway approaches are, at times, last resort options in difficult airway management. In Special Operations these interventions confront distorted anatomy from combat trauma, extreme conditions, and may be performed by non-medically trained personnel. Under these circumstances, needle cricothyroidotomy using a large bore intravenous catheter can be considered. A small syringe connected to the needle can confirm transtracheal placement through air aspiration before passing the angiocatheter over the needle. Button activated retracting needles should be avoided for this when possible. We recommend a 3-mL Luer-lock syringe because a small syringe is better suited for generating pressure and once the catheter is in the trachea, this same syringe can be connected to bag valve ventilation by replacing its plunger with a connector from a 6.5-, 7-, or 7.5-mm endotracheal tube. Adding these small and light high-yield items to the Tactical Combat Casualty Care medic inventory should be considered in future revisions.

Keywords: military medicine; airway management; combat disorders; intubation, intratracheal

PMID: 35278323 PubMed Citation

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Pulseless Arrest After Rapid Sequence Intubation of the Massively Hemorrhaged Warfighter: A Case Series

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Schwarzkoph BW, Iteen D, Auten B. 22(1). 104 - 107. (Case Reports)

Abstract

Management of hemorrhagic shock and airway stabilization are two pillars of trauma resuscitation which have a dependent, yet incompletely understood relationship. Patients presenting with traumatic hemorrhage may manifest shock physiology prior to intubation, conferring a higher risk of postintubation hypotension, pulseless arrest, and mortality. This case series describes of a group of seven US military members with combat-related trauma who experienced pulseless arrest after rapid sequence intubation in a role 2 or role 3 setting. All except one of the patients had hemodynamics suggesting hemorrhagic shock prior to intubation. This case series highlights the need for further research to define which trauma patients are at risk of postintubation pulseless arrest. It also focuses on the knowledge gap related to the role that delayed airway management and judicious blood product resuscitation may play in preventable death after injury.

Keywords: pulseless arrest; traumatic arrest; rapid sequence intubation; transfusion; TCCC

PMID: 35278324 PubMed Citation

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