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Featured Articles

Fall 2007

An Unconscious Diver With Pulmonary Abnormalities: Problems Associated With Closed Circuit Underwater Breathing Apparatus

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Adkins DE, Mahon RT, Bennett S. 07(4). 28 - 32. (Journal Article)

Abstract

Closed circuit underwater breathing apparatus (UBA) have gained popularity in recreational diving. Closed circuit UBAs carry a unique set of risks to the diver. We present the case of a diver who lost consciousness while diving and had pulmonary abnormalities. The case is illustrative of the diving related problems associated with closed circuit UBA that a physician may be faced with.

What Every Sof Medic Should Know About Agroterrorism - Part I

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Farr KD. 07(4). 33 - 37. (Journal Article)

Abstract

Agroterrorism is "the deliberate introduction of a disease agent into livestock herds for the purposes of undermining socio-economic stability and/or generating fear." The threat of an agroterrorist attack on American soil is a growing concern. The financial, political, and social consequences of an attack are potentially enormous. This article will help SOF medics increase their understanding of the risks and consequences of agroterrorism and the foreign animal diseases that pose a threat.

A Novel Application Of Hydrogel To Improve The Asherman Chest Seal® In A Deployed Environment

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Nowrouzzadeh F. 07(4). 38 - 42. (Journal Article)

Abstract

There are many challenges when practicing medicine in an operational environment. These challenges can be compounded with multiple traumatic injuries and extreme environments. The Asherman chest seal® has been issued to the U.S. Navy as a standard piece of medical equipment used to treat thoracic injuries. In the austere setting, there have been a number of case reports of the device failing to maintain a seal. By using an adhesive material called hydrogel, a water based polymer compound, with the chest seal, successful seal of penetrating chest wounds have been reported. This combination provides a way to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of medical personnel's live-saving gear.

Joint Special Operations Task Force - Phillipines (jsotf-p) Joint Medcap Planning

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Fletcher J, Dominguez J, Walker T, Gallaher P. 07(4). 43 - 49. (Journal Article)

Abstract

Over the last several years civil military operations (CMO) have increasingly become a vital part of a commander's overall mission strategy. Special Operations Forces Medics help support a commander's CMO plan by planning, coordinating, and executing medical civil action programs (MEDCAPs). SOF Medics face unique challenges in planning and successfully executingMEDCAPs at the operational and tactical level of war. However, because of shared experiences in different combatant commands, civil affairs teams (CAT-As), and operational detachments alpha (ODAs) are developing successful tactics, techniques, and procedures (TTPs) for conductingMEDCAPs through a professional peer exchange within the JSOTF-P. The TTPs developed enable the CAT-A or ODA to immediately establish credibility, foster rapport, and improve contacts with local government units, local government organizations, non-government organizations, and host nation counterparts. The professional peer exchange provides the CAT-A or ODA team with the opportunity to learn the planning and logistical requirements of conducting a MEDCAP in the Joint Special Operations Task Force - Philippines AOR.

Use Of Unapproved Products, Off-label Use, And Black-box warning... A variation Of Newton's Third Law Of The Practical Application Of The Rule Of Unintended Consequences... Considerations In Military Operational Medicine

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Pierson JF. 07(4). 50 - 60. (Journal Article)

Abstract

This article discusses the regulatory requirements for the use of unapproved drugs and off-label use of drugs and provides specific examples for military medicine. Additionally, it explains issues associated with standardization by the Service as a designated set, kit, or outfit as opposed to a general guidance. The former situation can be interpreted as a de facto policy whereas the latter is an adaptation of practice of medicine.