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Summer 2017 Journal (Vol 17 Ed 2) (Digital Download Only)

This edition is out of print and is available as a digital download only. Upon completion of payment, the title will be added to your inventory and you will receive a link in your email to download this title.

Vol 17 Ed 2
Summer 2017 Journal of Special Operations Medicine
ISSN: 1553-9768

Table of Contents
$36.75
Winter 2017 Journal (Vol 17 Ed 4)

Vol 17 Ed 4
Winter 2017 Journal of Special Operations Medicine
ISSN: 1553-9768

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$36.75
Fall 2017 Journal (Vol 17 Ed 3)

Vol 17 Ed 3
Fall 2017 Journal of Special Operations Medicine
ISSN: 1553-9768

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$36.75
Spring 2017 Journal (Vol 17 Ed 1)

Vol 17 Ed 1
Spring 2017 Journal of Special Operations Medicine
ISSN: 1553-9768

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$36.75
Spring 2018 Journal (Vol 18 Ed 1)

Vol 18 Ed 1
Spring 2018 Journal of Special Operations Medicine
ISSN: 1553-9768

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$36.75
Summer 2018 Journal (Vol 18 Ed 2)

Vol 18 Ed 2
Summer 2018 Journal of Special Operations Medicine
ISSN: 1553-9768

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$36.75
Fall 2018 Journal (Vol 18 Ed 3)

Vol 18 Ed 3
Fall 2018 Journal of Special Operations Medicine
ISSN: 1553-9768

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$36.75
Spring 2019 Journal (Vol 19 Ed 1)

Vol 19 Ed 1
Spring 2019 Journal of Special Operations Medicine
ISSN: 1553-9768

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$36.75
Summer 2019 Journal (Vol 19 Ed 2)

Vol 19 Ed 2
Summer 2019 Journal of Special Operations Medicine
ISSN: 1553-9768

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$36.75
Fall 2019 Journal (Vol 19 Ed 3)

Vol 19 Ed 3
Fall 2019 Journal of Special Operations Medicine
ISSN: 1553-9768

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Available for preorder. Estimated ship date is September 30th 2019

$38.00
Winter 2018 Journal (Vol 18 Ed 4)

Vol 18 Ed 4
Winter 2018 Journal of Special Operations Medicine
ISSN: 1553-9768

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$36.75
Case Presentation: Creation and Utilization of a Novel Field Improvised Autologous Transfusion System in a Combat Casualty

Scarborough T, Turconi M, Callaway DW 19(2). 134 - 137 (Journal Article)

This case report describes the technical aspects in first use of a novel field improvised autologous transfusion (FIAT) system. It highlights a potential solution for specific trauma patients during advanced resuscitative care (ARC) and prolonged field care (PFC) scenarios where other blood products are not available.

$35.00
Improvised Inguinal Junctional Tourniquets: Recommendations From the Special Operations Combat Medical Skills Sustainment Course

Kerr W, Hubbard B, Anderson B, Montgomery HR, Glassberg E, King DR, Hardin RD, Knight RM, Cunningham CW 19(2). 128 - 133 (Journal Article)

Effectively and rapidly controlling significant junctional hemorrhage is an important effort of Tactical Combat Casualty Care (TCCC) and can potentially contribute to greater survival on the battlefield. Although the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved labeling of four devices for use as junctional tourniquets, many Special Operations Forces (SOF) medics do not carry commercially marketed junctional tourniquets. As part of ongoing educational improvement during Special Operations Combat Medical Skills Sustainment Courses (SOCMSSC), the authors surveyed medics to determine why they do not carry commercial tourniquets and present principles and methods of improvised junctional tourniquet (IJT) application. The authors describe the construction and application of IJTs, including the use of available pressure delivery devices and emphasizing that successful application requires sufficient and repetitive training.

$35.00
Without Jumping to Conclusions

Hampton K 19(2). 127 (Journal Article)

$35.00
Fever of Unknown Origin in US Soldier: Telemedical Consultation Limitations in a Deployment to West Africa

Auchincloss PJ, Nam JJ, Blyth D, Childs G, Kraft K, Robben PM, Pamplin JC 19(2). 123 - 126 (Journal Article)

Objective: Review the application of telemedicine support for managing a patient with possible sepsis, suspected malaria, and unusual musculoskeletal symptoms. Clinical Context: Regionally Aligned Forces (RAF) supporting US Army Africa/Southern European Task Force (USARAF/ SETAF) in the Africa Command area of responsibility. Care provided by a small Role I facility on the compound. Organic Medical Expertise: Five 68W combat medics (one is the patient); one SOCM trained 68W combat medic. No US provider present in country. Closest Medical Support: Organic battalion physician assistant (PA) located in the USA; USARAF PA located in Italy; French Role II located in bordering West African country; medical consultation sought via telephone, WhatsApp® (communication with French physician) or over unclassified, encrypted e-mail. Earliest Evacuation: Estimated at 12 to 24 hours with appropriate country clearances and approval to fly from three countries including French forces support approval.

$35.00
Update: Five Years of Prolonged Field Care in Special Operations Medicine

Riesberg JC, Loos PE 19(2). 122 (Journal Article)

This brief quarterly update from the SOMA Prolonged Field Care (PFC) Working Group focuses on the first of ten sequential reviews of the PFC Core Capabilities, starting with advanced airway management.

$35.00
Introduction to the NATO Special Operations Combat Medic Research Ongoing Series

Sardianos D, Boland J 19(2). 118 - 121 (Journal Article)

Technology has become a necessity in modern society, providing capabilities that have never been experienced before. The integration of such capabilities arms today's Special Operations medic with abilities that can make a vast difference to the survivability rate of an ill or injured patient. Taking advantage of new technological capabilities such as advanced monitoring and diagnostics and portable ultrasound also plays a key role; together with the evolution in modern communication.

$35.00
Exertional Heat Stroke: Pathophysiology, Epidemiology, Diagnosis, Treatment, and Prevention

Knapik JJ, Epstein Y 19(2). 108 - 116 (Journal Article)

Temperature increases due to climate changes and operations expected to be conducted in hot environments make heat-related injuries a major medical concern for the military. The most serious of heat-related injuries is exertional heat stroke (EHS). EHS generally occurs when health individual perform physical activity in hot environments and the balance between body heat production and heat dissipation is upset resulting in excessive body heat storage. Blood flow to the skin is increased to assist in dissipating heat while gut blood flow is considerably reduced, and this increases the permeability of the gastrointestinal mucosa. Toxic materials from gut bacteria leak through the gastrointestinal mucosa into the central circulation triggering an inflammatory response, disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), multiorgan failure, and vascular collapse. In addition, high heat directly damages cellular proteins resulting in cellular death. In the United States military, the overall incidence of clinically diagnosed heat stroke from 1998 to 2017 was (mean ± standard deviation) 2.7 ± 0.5 cases/10,000 Soldier-years and outpatient rates rose over this period. The cornerstone of EHS diagnosis is recognition of central nervous dysfunction (ataxia, loss of balance, convulsions, irrational behavior, unusual behavior, inappropriate comments, collapse, and loss of consciousness) and a body core temperature (obtained with a rectal thermometer) usually >40.5°C (105°F). The gold standard treatment is whole body cold water immersion. In the field where water immersion is not available it may be necessary to use ice packs or very cold, wet towels placed over as much of the body as possible before transportation of the victim to higher levels of medical care. The key to prevention of EHS and other heat-related injuries is proper heat acclimation, understanding work/rest cycles, proper hydration during activity, and assuring that physical activity is matched to the Soldiers' fitness levels. Also, certain dietary supplements (DSs) may have effects on energy expenditure, gastrointestinal function, and thermoregulation that should be considered and understood. In many cases over-motivation is a major risk factor. Commanders and trainers should be alert to any change in the Soldier's behavior. Proper attention to these factors should considerably reduce the incidence of EHS.

$35.00
Measles Vaccination: A Matter of Confidence and Commitment

Turner R 19(2). 105 - 106 (Journal Article)

$35.00
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