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Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever

Burnett MW 16(3). 63 - 64 (Journal Article)

$37.00
Schistosomiasis: Traverers in Africa

Strohmayer J, Matthews I, Locke R 16(3). 47 - 52 (Journal Article)

Schistosomiasis is a parasitic infection acquired through freshwater exposure in the tropics. It is an infection that can have devastating implications to military personnel if it is not recognized and treated, especially later in life. While there is an abundance of information available about schistosomiasis in endemic populations, the information on nonendemic populations, such as deployers, is insufficient. Definitive studies for this population are lacking, but there are actions that can and should be taken to prevent infection and to treat patients. This literary review presents a case study, reviews basic science, and explores the information available about schistosomiasis in nonendemic populations. Specifically, the authors provide recommendations for the prevention, diagnosis, and postexposure management in military personnel.

$37.00
The Hidden Complexity of Biological "Dirty Bombs": Implications for Special Operations Medical Personnel

Washington MA, Blythe J 16(4). 82 - 84 (Journal Article)

The recent capture of a terrorist in Belgium carrying explosives, fecal matter, and animal tissue may indicate a shift from conventional weapons to crude bacteriological preparations as instruments of terror. It is important to note that although such weapons lack technological sophistication, bacteria are inherently complex, unpredictable, and undetectable in the field. Therefore, it is important that Special Operations medical personnel understand the complications that such seemingly simple devices can add to the treatment of casualties in the field and subsequent evaluation in the clinic.

$37.00
Prolonged Field Care of a Casualty With Penetrating Chest Trauma

Barnhart G, Cullinan W, Pickett JR 16(4). 99 - 101 (Case Reports)

As Special Operations mission sets shift to regions with less coalition medical infrastructure, the need for quality long-term field care has increased. More and more, Special Operations Medics will be expected to maintain casualties in the field well past the "golden hour" with limited resources and other tactical limitations. This case report describes an extended-care scenario (>12 hours) of a casualty with a chest wound, from point of injury to eventual casualty evacuation and hand off at a Role II facility. This case demonstrates the importance of long-term tactical medical considerations and the effectiveness of minimal fluid resuscitation in treating penetrating thoracic trauma.

$37.00
Telemedicine to Reduce Medical Risk in Austere Medical Environments: The Virtual Critical Care Consultation (VC3) Service

Powell D, McLeroy RD, Riesberg J, Vasios WN, Miles EA, Dellavolpe J, Keenan S, Pamplin JC 16(4). 102 - 109 (Journal Article)

One of the core capabilities of prolonged field care is telemedicine. We developed the Virtual Critical Care Consult (VC3) Service to provide Special Operations Forces (SOF) medics with on-demand, virtual consultation with experienced critical care physicians to optimize management and improve outcomes of complicated, critically injured or ill patients. Intensive-care doctors staff VC3 continuously. SOF medics access this service via phone or e-mail. A single phone call reaches an intensivist immediately. An e-mail distribution list is used to share information such as casualty images, vital signs flowsheet data, and short video clips, and helps maintain situational awareness among the VC3 critical care providers and other key SOF medical leaders. This real-time support enables direct communication between the remote provider and the clinical subject matter expert, thus facilitating expert management from near the point of injury until definitive care can be administered. The VC3 pilot program has been extensively tested in field training exercises and validated in several real-world encounters. It is an immediately available capability that can reduce medical risk and is scalable to all Special Operations Command forces.

$37.00
Case of a 5-Year-Old Foreign National Who Sustained Penetrating Abdominal Trauma

McLeroy RD, Ellis JL, Karnopp JM, Dellavolpe J, Gurney J, Keenan S, Powell D, Riesberg J, Edwards M, Matos R, Pamplin JC 16(4). 110 - 113 (Journal Article)

Objective: Review application of telemedicine support for penetrating trauma. Clinical context: Special Operations Resuscitation Team (SORT) deployed in Africa Area of Responsibility (AOR) Organic expertise: Internal Medicine physician, two Special Operations Combat medics (SOCMs), and one radiology technician Closest surgical support: Non-US surgical support 20km away; a nonsurgeon who will perform surgeries; neighboring country partner-force surgeon 2 hours by fixedwing flight. Earliest evacuation: Evacuated 4 days after presentation to a neighboring country with surgical capability.

$37.00
Spring 2018 Journal (Vol 18 Ed 1)

Vol 18 Ed 1
Spring 2018 Journal of Special Operations Medicine
ISSN: 1553-9768

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Available for preorder. Estimated ship date is March 31st 2019

$40.00
Spring 2019 Journal (Vol 19 Ed 1)

Vol 19 Ed 1
Spring 2019 Journal of Special Operations Medicine
ISSN: 1553-9768

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$40.00
Winter 2018 Journal (Vol 18 Ed 4)

Vol 18 Ed 4
Winter 2018 Journal of Special Operations Medicine
ISSN: 1553-9768

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$40.00
Fall 2019 Journal (Vol 19 Ed 3)

Vol 19 Ed 3
Fall 2019 Journal of Special Operations Medicine
ISSN: 1553-9768

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$40.00
Summer 2019 Journal (Vol 19 Ed 2)

Vol 19 Ed 2
Summer 2019 Journal of Special Operations Medicine
ISSN: 1553-9768

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$40.00
Winter 2011 Journal (Vol 11 Ed 4)

Vol 11 Ed 4
Winter 2011 Journal of Special Operations Medicine
ISSN: 1553-9768

$38.00
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