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This week's featured articles

4/15/2022

Injuries and Interventions on Transported Military Working Dogs Within the US Central Command

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Johnson SA, Carr C, Reeves LK, Bean K, Schauer SG. 22(1). 97 - 101. (Journal Article)

Abstract

Background: Limited veterinary care is available in the far forward environment, leading to human medical personnel being responsible, in part, for treatment of military working dogs (MWD). Though guidelines for MWD care exist, there is little research on the care and treatment of MWDs by human medical personnel. There is a lot of research on the care and treatment of MWDs. Methods: This is a secondary analysis of a dataset from the Transportation Command (TRANSCOM) Regulating Command & Control and Evacuation System (TRAC2ES) database within the US Central Command (CENTCOM) from 2008 to 2018. Within this dataset specific to regulated transport from locations within CENTCOM, we abstracted all entries involving MWDs and analyzed causes of injury, type of injury, and interventions performed on traumatically and non-traumatically injured MWDs. Results: Within our dataset, there were 84 MWD cases for analysis. Of those, 36 (43%) were transported for traumatic injuries, and the remaining 48 (57%) were transported for other medical ailments. The most common cause of trauma was gunshot wound (31%), followed by explosion (22%). The majority of trauma MWDs had injuries to the extremities (67%), and hemorrhage requiring intervention occurred in 25%. The most common interventions performed on traumas were analgesia (67%), antibiotics (31%), IV fluids (28%), and surgery (31%). The most common indications that occurred in MWDs treated for nontraumatic medical indications were gastrointestinal diseases (33%), followed by nontraumatic orthopedic injuries (21%). Conclusions: Of the MWDs in our dataset, most were transported for nontraumatic medical events. The most frequent intervention performed was medication administration for both traumatic and medical ailments. Our dataset adds to the limited body of MWD data from theater.

Keywords: military working dogs; surveillance; security

PMID: 35278322 PubMed Citation

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Hemoglobin-Based Oxygen Carrier for the Reconstitution of Canine Freeze-Dried Plasma in an In Vitro Model of Resuscitation

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Edwards TH, Meledeo MA, Peltier GC, Henderson AF, Hammill RM, McIntosh CS, Bynum JA. 22(1). 111 - 114. (Journal Article)

Abstract

Military working dogs (MWDs) are force multipliers that are at risk for severe trauma when employed on the battlefield. When in severe hemorrhagic shock, MWDs require both oxygen- carrying capacity and replacement of vascular volume and coagulation factors. The objective of this study was to evaluate the hemostatic capacity of canine freeze-dried plasma (cFDP) with a Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved hemoglobin- based oxygen carrier (HBOC) in an in vitro model of resuscitation. Whole blood (WB) was collected from 10 MWDs, and these samples were diluted by 10%, 25%, or 40% with either cFDP (reconstituted with water), HBOC, cFDP (reconstituted with HBOC), or an equal volume of a 1:1 ratio of cFDP (reconstituted with water) and HBOC. Hemostatic parameters were minimally changed based on evaluation of prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time, fibrinogen and thromboelastography at the 10% and 25% dilutions, and parameters consistent with a hypocoagulability were seen at dilutions of 40%. Based on the results of this study, additional research is warranted to determine if cFDP reconstituted with HBOC is a viable resuscitation product in canine trauma.

Keywords: canine; hemoglobin-based oxygen carrier; freezedried plasma; oxyglobin; thromboelastography; dogs

PMID: 35278326 PubMed Citation

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